Into the depths of spirituality critical

Myers Inspiring crowds of thirsty Christians, Johannes Tauler was one of the great preachers of church history. Tauler lived during tumultuous times in fourteenth-century Europe.

I am a very young pagan, both in terms of my own age 27 and the number of years I have self-consciously identified as such one, very eventful, year.

But as a full year rounds and I return to the season wherein I began, I find that my path forward looks very different than I expected it to. This latter approach has not been well received by all with whom I have come into contact.

Some of my questions may have been too bluntly stated. While others might exclude their critical lenses from their spiritual paths, perhaps out of a desire to preserve mystery, I cannot. Nor can I accept criticisms from others who suggest that my pagan path is less valid, or less sincere, as a consequence of this choice.

It might be the academic in me, but my first and most powerful impulse is to understand. Lots of problems — including the miscommunications that tend to land me in hot water — seem to be caused by a lack of shared terms, a difference in framework, or a mismatch between fundamental assumptions.

This is my own bias, one I am trying to overcome. I do see the critical lenses as essential to my own Naturalistic Pagan path. I am encouraged to find that the many authors at HP, and within Godless Paganism: Voices of Non-Theistic Pagans, seem to agree. Questioning, challenging, deconstructing, and engaging good scholarship will always be essential tools for those, like myself, who cannot accept a spiritual path that marginalizes our critical lenses.

My own scholarship is predicated on the notion that such a division is unnecessary and even harmful. One of my challenges, going forward, is to clarify for myself and others how important it is to put our critical discourses — the natural sciences, social sciences, history, logic, anthropology, etc.

This relationship, this integration, cannot only be for the good of the individual, in order to guide their personal spiritual journey. It must also offer up a way of seeing, of navigating both our deepest and most mundane life experiences, that leads to more just communities and a healthier world.

It must transform our ways of thinking about ourselves, the world, and the role of religion for us as Humanists who seek to cultivate a relationship with the world and all its Beings. NOMA is the view that science and religion speak about fundamentally different questions.

At first blush, NOMA seems to be a useful, perhaps even necessary, way of framing the situation. This limits the way we are able to think and speak about religion in public and in private.

Such a view precludes a kin-based, non-dualist understanding of human and non-human nature; a view which, I would argue, is widely held both among modern pagans and members of tribal cultures today. Redefining Religion as Everyday Life. If this, too, is religion, then certainly the natural and social sciences have insights to offer!

The goal, of course, is not to trample on or dismiss non-empirically verifiable beliefs, but rather to expand the conversation, include multiple voices, and speak more broadly and inclusively about human and non-human life, with all of their intricacies. How could we possibly accomplish this without our critical tools?

Into the depths of spirituality critical

Our spirituality integrates not only ways of seeing the world — critical and spiritual — but also integrates us into the world.

It is a spirituality that builds deep connections between and among all the Beings with whom we share our breathing, dancing, changing planet, whirling through space. If there is a set of tools that offers us insight into those lives with whom we share a deep kinship, from our fellow primates and mammals all the way back into the depths of the sea, then it is useful and essential to our spiritual path s.

We must heed what these tools teach us, whether the lesson is a humbling confirmation of the kinship of all life, or a startling reminder about the fragility of our ecosystems.

By doing so, we also re claim religion as a fundamentally human endeavor, one that helps us speak to the depths and heights of our experiences.

We refuse to act as if religion is irrelevant to the greater conversation about the future of our species and planet, about systems of injustice. And while the scientific method must continue to operate according to its own rules, we refuse the stance that the critical, empirical tools of the sciences have no place in making sense of religious experience.

If religion is only about non-empirically verifiable experiences, and even the critical tools of the humanities — deconstruction, aesthetic and ethical criticism, etc.

The scope of religious life and thought shrinks down to a hyper-subjective sandbox, and our conversations become merely comparative, rather than mutually transformative.

It ceases to be a conversation between ourselves and the world, and becomes merely self-referential, beholden only to our personal biases and drives toward wish-fulfillment.Our spirituality integrates not only ways of seeing the world – critical and spiritual – but also integrates us into the world.

It is a spirituality that builds deep connections between and among all the Beings with whom we share our breathing, dancing, changing planet, whirling through space. If there is a . Zaehner is generally critical of what he sees as narcissistic tendencies in nature mysticism.

Mystics stress that their experiences give them "insight into depths of truth unplumbed by the discursive intellect." of Religion: Conclusions and Future Prospects", in Sreib, Heinz; Hood, Ralph W., Semantics and Psychology of Spirituality: A.

Integrative Spirituality: Transforming Darkness into Light. Print Friendly or Save as PDF body-mind facets into one cohesive life force requires a certain “melting” or “boiling down” of our psyches into our depths, our unconscious. so thinking well is critical to our emotional health and therefore to our spirituality.

Critical. The person and mission of Jesus Christ stand at the center of priestly spirituality. Hence all the reaections in this work revolve unswervingly around Jesus Christ and his mission.

Into the depths of spirituality critical

Jesus is the source and norm of priestly existence. Sep 26,  · INTO THE DEPTHS OF SPIRITUALITY: CRITICAL ANALYSIS ON LITERARY MYSTICISM By E.J. Caoile, C.L. Castilla, W.M. De Guzman, C.T. De Torres & G.A. Dimasin Filipinos are known to be religious and inclined to spirituality, and it is needless to say that they believe that there is more to life than what meets the eye.

Integrative Spirituality: Transforming Darkness into Light. Print Friendly or Save as PDF body-mind facets into one cohesive life force requires a certain “melting” or “boiling down” of our psyches into our depths, our unconscious.

so thinking well is critical to our emotional health and therefore to our spirituality. Critical.

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